Saturday, 4 February 2017

Black Cockatoos, Blue-tongued Lizard and Baby Quails

1. Yellow-tailed black-cockatoos (Calyptorhynchus funereus)

These are Yellow-tailed black-cockatoos (Calyptorhynchus funereus). The video includes a young bird begging/calling for food. Their population is rapidly declining due to loss of habitat. It's interesting to note that the cockatoos in this video are feeding on two different introduced plants. Protea cones  (Protea sp) from South Africa and Pine cones (Pinus radiata) from North America. However, these additional food sources will not help them in regard to to finding nest hollows.
If you hear the occasional thud in the sound recording, it is the sound of bits of pine cone hitting the ground.

( Yellow-tailed Black-cockatoos  - Click the play button)

2.  Blotched Blue tongue Lizard - Slow Motion Licks (Tiliqua nigrolutea)
 
There are loads of Blue-tongue lizards around at the moment. This one was trying to come in the back door. We relocated it further up the backyard away from our cars. It was also an opportunity to get some slow motion shots of them licking the air with their blue tongues. The red on the mouth is not blood. We fed it a raspberry before releasing it :-)

There are eight species in the genus Tiliqua. All are found in Australia with the exception of Tiliqua gigas, which is found in New Guinea and parts of Indonesia. Here in Tasmania we get Tiliqua nigrolutea, the Blotched blue-tongue.

(Blotched Blue-tongue Lizard - Click the play button)


3. Update on the Quail Chicks

Remember the wee one day old quail chicks? Here they are 16 days later. If you didn't see them at one day old then you can see them here: https://youtu.be/AZ-7xVJ33SE 

(Japanese Quails - Click the play button)


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14 comments:

  1. A great videos. I had seen your Quail one but not the other 2. wonderful footage of the Cockatoos and to see the tongue adn how they use it to eat. That is quite a big Lizard and again great to see it in SM to see the tongue action. Have a marvellous weekend.

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    1. Thanks very much. Glad you enjoyed the videos.

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  2. Very enjoyable video again, thanks. I only occasionally see the black cockies flying over - the white cockies I see -and hear! - every day. Great slow motion of the blue-tongue lizard. Those chicks certainly grew fast!
    btw I appreciate your music background - interesting and does not overpower the video subjects.

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    1. Thanks. We are the opposite here. While we have Sulphur crested cockatoos in the area they are a rarity in my backyard. They seem to prefer areas with pasture land.

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  3. Hello, I enjoyed the videos. The Cockatoos are beautiful and I love the cute Quail chicks. They did grow quickly.
    Love the cool lizard too. Thank you for linking up and sharing your post. Happy Saturday, enjoy your weekend!

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    1. Thanks as always for your comments and for the link up.

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  4. Great videos of the bird.

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  5. Really wonderful to see the Black Cockatoo video. We have some of them fly into the tops of our trees and their munchings fall down to the ground - it was fun seeing them up so close!
    Same with the blue-tongue! A really good video there as well.
    Aren't the chickies growing!! I was really surprised at their progress.
    Bye for now and thank you :D)

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    1. Thanks for watching. Munchings is a good word :-)

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  6. Belle série ;-)
    Céline & Philippe

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    1. Merci de regarder mes vidéos.

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  7. That is a long name of a cockatoo! What a beautiful bird. I hope that they can stabilize their populations.

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    1. Yes. We tend to just call them 'black cockies'. Thanks for watching.

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