Saturday, 26 November 2016

Butterflies and Nesting Coots

On a recent trip we stopped off at Lake Dulverton where I found this pair of Eurasian Coots ( Fulica atra ) busily building there nest among the Water Ribbons.






The  Australian Painted Lady butterflies (Vanessa kershawi) have been very active lately. You may notice it is very similar to Vanessa cardui which has an almost worldwide distribution.




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Saturday, 19 November 2016

Blotched Blue-tongue Lizards (Tiliqua nigrolutea)

Several Blotched Blue-tongue Lizards (Tiliqua nigrolutea) have been seen in the backyard over the last few weeks. You'll notice one of the lizards has a large tick on it. This should fall off naturally soon. These are the largest lizards we have in Tasmania and can reach just over half a metre or 550mm. (21.7 inches).  The Blotched blue-tongue is found in the south-east of Australia and Tasmania. On the mainland it is usually found at higher elevations but here in Tassie it is found from sea level up to around 750m. They are omnivorous, feeding on insects, snails, flowers, and fruit. In a backyard situation they will be attracted by pet food and your strawberry patch.



Thank You!
Since September I've gone from about 12 subscribers on my YouTube channel to 102. Thank you all very much for your support and encouragement. If you have not yet subscribed please consider doing so, as not all of my videos appear on this blog. If you are logged in with your google account you simply need to use the Youtube/Subscribe button below.

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Wednesday, 16 November 2016

Tasmanian Wombat and a Dusky Woodswallow

I came across this wombat along the Bluff Hill Road near Arthur River.  The area is part of the Arthur Pieman Conservation Area. The Tasmanian wombat (Vombatus ursinus tasmaniensis) is a subspecies of the Common wombat. Wile mainland wombats can reach up to 1.2 m in length, the Tasmanian wombat averages 85cm.

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This rather light coloured Dusky Woodswallow (Artamus cyanopterus) was seen in the Rocky Cape National Park at Sisters Beach. These are summer migrants in Tasmania. They often catch insects on the wing however, sometimes, as in this case, they will find a convenient perch and look for insects on the ground.

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Tuesday, 15 November 2016

Rise of the Supermoon - 14th Nove 2016

Super moon as viewed from Table Cape, Wynyard, Tasmania.

With the closest so called "Supermoon" in 68 years I thought I should capture a bit of video. Unfortunately local conditions were not great with a lot of cloud and haze, and just enough wind to shake my tripod. Despite this, I still managed to get a couple of minutes of film, which I have sped up, as it rose above the cloudy horizon.


(Slightly sped up)



I hope you enjoy the video.


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Linked to Our World Tuesday 

Saturday, 12 November 2016

Mountain Dragons ( Rankinia diemensis )

The Mountain Dragons in this video were filmed in my backyard a couple of weeks ago.  Over the years we have created lots of rocky areas in the yard which has greatly increased the lizard population.



Of Tasmania's 17 lizard species this is the only one which is not a skink. It belongs to the family Agamidae and it has the most southerly distribution of all the lizards in this family.

You can get quite close to a Mountain Dragon if you move slowly. If they run they will only go a short distance and then stop again, hoping that you can't see them. It works too as sometimes you can't see them because they blend in so well among leaves and sticks.

They are found in the north and east of Tasmania, in dry forest and heathland as these areas are more open to the sun. Their diet consists of ants and other small invertebrates. They can grow to around 20cm (about 8") including their tail.


I hope you enjoy the video.


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Saturday, 5 November 2016

Silver Gull Flight in Slow Motion

The Silver gull ( Chroicocephalus novaehollandiae )  is one of three gull species found in Tasmania. They are often taken for granted or even despised as raucous scavengers. Watching them here, flying and gliding  in slow motion, I hope you will agree they can  actually be graceful and beautiful bird.

I hope you enjoy the video.





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Cute Baby Sun Conure being Preened by a Green-cheeked Conure ( Parrots )


Allow me to introduce Solly, the 9 week old Sun Conure, and Eccles, the Green-cheeked Conure.  After a messy feed, Eccles decided that Solly needed a good preening.

I hope you enjoy the video.








Yes I know this doesn't really fall under the topic "Nature of Tasmania" which is why I need to get around to changing the blog title to mostly nature.


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