Thursday, 1 September 2016

Wildlife Watching at Narawntapu National Park



On Monday we enjoyed a day  out at Narawntapu National Park. The highlight of the day for me came just as we were leaving. There is a small ephemeral body of water that comes quite close to the road. We stopped to make a final scan, with binoculars, across the water and surrounding field.  Sure enough there were several species I had not already seen that day. Great egret, Australasian pipit, Flame robin, White-fronted chat, and two Black-fronted dotterels. The dotterels were foraging along the edge of the water and gradually making there way around to where we were parked. I've been trying to get a reasonable photo of these birds for a long time so this was my big chance. I was quite happy with the results:



 

Black-fronted dotterels

Other highlights included seeing 74 Forester Kangaroos; the most I have ever seen there. There were the usual Bennett's wallabies, and Tasmanian pademelons. We only spotted one Wombat. Some years ago I remember counting over 80 wombats within just a couple of kilometres but, sadly, the population has been decimated by mange. Five mammal species in all if I include the European rabbit.  All but the rabbit can be seen in the following video.






There were not a lot of birds present at the hide apart from four rather entertaining Musk ducks. One just wanted to spin around in circles on the water while trying to doze.




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Linked with Wild Bird Wednesday

18 comments:

  1. It looks like a beautiful place to visit. The photos of the Dotterels are great - especially the one with the full reflection. The videos are wonderful. I especially liked the views of the paperbark standing in the water. There is a depth and perspective that I have never achieved with still photos.

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  2. Thanks for the comment. I enjoy photography but lately I've been more interested in video. I Would liked to have taken video of the dotterels but I would have scared them off getting out the car to get my tripod :-)

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  3. wow,you did get really good shots,the bird looked as though he was showing off for you!phyllis

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    1. Thank you Phyllis Oller, Glad you like them.

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  4. I didn't know where Narawntapu National Park was. I Googled & discovered it's Baker's Beach area, I haven't been there for many many years. I really like the wonderful reflection of the bird in the 2nd photo.

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    1. Thank you Tony McGurk - Yes that's the place. Used to be called Asbestos Range National Park. I think the name might have kept people away :-)

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  5. Beautiful wild life in this national park.

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    1. Thank you Rajesh - It's a great place to get close to the wildlife. Most of our mammals are nocturnal but at this place they are very active throughout the day as there is a lot of competition for food.

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  6. Your videos are really very good. Those animals and birds seem exotic to me here in the UK. It's good to hear that Goldfinches are still around. here in the UK their popluation has exploded . Now the commonest bird in many gardens.

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  7. Thank you Phil Slade - Thanks for the positive feedback on the videos. How are the Goldcrests doing. I only seen them twice in eight years. I was way up north though, past Inverness and beyond.

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  8. Hello!:) The dotterel is a very striking looking bird, and your images are great. Such beautiful scenery in your videos, and perhaps the spinning around of the duck is the way they fall asleep. Loved both video clips.:)

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    1. Thank you Breathtaking - Glad you enjoyed the videos.

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  9. Hello, your Dotterels are cute. They look similar to our Plovers. Great shots and videos. Happy Wednesday, enjoy your day!

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    1. Thank you eileeninmd - Glad you enjoyed them. Plovers, Dotterels, and Lapwings belong to the same family, Charadriidae, and many can look quite similar.

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  10. The reflection shot of the Dotterel is brilliant and both the video with music are amazing.

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    1. Thanks Margaret Adamson - Thanks for commenting. I quite liked the one with wings outstretched but the relection shot seems the more popular.

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  11. love the Black-fronted dotterels. I was able to see a few when I visited Queensland :)

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  12. Thanks NatureFootstep - Always a pleasure to see them. There are only a few places round abouts where I tend to find them.

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