Saturday, 18 April 2015

Striated Fieldwren

... and a Penguin Story (below the photos)

The Striated Fieldwren (Calamanthus fuliginosus) could easily be dismissed as just another little brown bird, but, on closer inspection,  it is seen to be beautifully marked and full of character.  Getting a good view through the binoculars is always a special moment. Getting a half decent photograph to capture those moments has always proven to be more difficult. I have plenty of shots of blurry flying objects and tails sticking out of bushes etc. 

There are two places where I can usually be sure to find these birds. The coastal heath at Rocky Cape and the heathland around Ronny Creek (near Cradle Mountain). Last week I was at Rocky Cape and after a bit of a picnic lunch at Burgess Cove my attention turned to the birds. The funny thing is, I was patiently scanning the area with the 'noccies  when a family member, in excited and not so quiet whispers,  pointed out the Striated Fieldwren perched on a bush directly behind me.  It turned out there was actually a pair of them. I fired off a couple of over exposed shots while the birds went about their business, flying low over the heath, moving from shrub to shrub.  Fortunately they were still fairly close and about a dozen shots later I came up with the two you see below. After years of trying, persistence and patience paid off.


Striated Fieldwren - Calamanthus fuliginosus




Striated Fieldwren - Calamanthus fuliginosus



Coastal Heath at Rocky Cape (Table Cape in the distance)


On a different subject, you can see the entrance to a cave in the middle of the large rock outcrop. That's North Cave. It's an old sea cave formed at a time of higher sea levels. It's about 6 metres in height and around 60 meters deep. You're not allowed in there these days as it contains archaeological remains of aboriginal occupation (middens, etc). However, 28 years ago (Aug. 1987) I did venture down to the very back of the cave where I found a lone Fairy Penguin (Eudyptula minor) in residence. It thus stands as the biggest penguin burrow I've ever found :-)

30 comments:

  1. Gorgeous photos!
    Have a great weekend!

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  2. Beautiful pictures of this Calamanthus fuliginosus .
    I have never seen.
    Have a good weekend.
    Best regards, Irma

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    1. Thanks for the comment Irma

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  3. Beautiful scenic shot and I love the cute Fieldwren! Great shots, enjoy your weekend!

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  4. Wow, that just seems like such an exotic stretch of coastline to me! I agree that the Fieldwren is a beautiful bird and your persistence has paid off! The penguin story in the cave appealed to my imagination also.

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    1. Thanks Christian. Rocky Cape National Park protects a beautiful stretch of coastline. Glad someone shares my interest in the giant penguin burrow :-)

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  5. Great photos of a couple of beautiful little birds. Persistence, and patience, and a bit of help from the family member! - paid off!

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    1. When she was trying to tell me about the Fieldwrens, I was too busy saying, "Shhh... Crescent Honeyeater." Nearly missed out!

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  6. That's a new bird to me and what a beauty too.

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    1. Thanks for commenting Adam

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  7. Not an easy bird to find but your photographs are stunnning of it

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  8. Cracking bird! I was at Ronny Creek this January - but it was hard to stand up because of the wind or see because of the sleet! Ah, summer!

    Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

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    1. That's Tassie for you. Much warmer than my previous abode in Northern Scotland though.

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  9. That is just about the cutest little bird ever, how adorable these images shares are!

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    1. Thanks Mary - Glad you enjoyed them.

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  10. Never heard of that particular wren but there's no mistaking the family it belongs to. Great shots and nice exposure to get the undertail detail like that.

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    1. Thanks Phil. I have quite a few dud shots to go with it too :-)

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  11. How exciting about finding that penguin in the back of the cave! So cool! great shot of it...glad its being protected now. And that sneaky field wren! Coming up behind you while you're scanning the horizon in the opposite direction! :-) Oh, my, such gorgeous shots of him!!!!

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    1. Thanks Marie. Sneaky is right

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  12. they're adorable. a bit similar to our carolina wren in markings, but more slender and pert, perhaps. :)

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    1. Thanks for commenting. Just looked up carolina wren. Nice bird!

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  13. I just discover your blog, very interesting !! Also thank you for your comments on my Great Blue Heron.

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  14. Just arrived here from Dominique's blog!!
    Not only you present beautiful photos, but the subjects are very interesting!
    both picture of the Striated Fieldwren are fantastic and with a perfect light. Congrats for your work!
    We have just returned from QL a couple of days ago and intend on establishing there for good in a near future.
    Since we are travellers, maybe we shall meet one day :)
    Tasmania and NZ are high on our list of places to go!
    Lovely to have discovered your blog!
    Cheers!

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    1. Thank you for the feedback Noushka. Glad you find the blog interesting.

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  15. Wonderful images of the fieldwren! Thanks for visiting my blog and sorry for being late in acknowledging you kind comments. I have been away from the screen for several days.

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    1. Thank for commenting Kenneth. Glad you liked it.

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