Wednesday, 29 April 2015

April Birds


This post shows just a few of the birds I have encountered during the month of April.

Working backwards, we'll start with this Eastern Great Egret (Ardea modesta) at the Tamar Island Wetlands on the 26th April. 

Eastern Great Egret - Ardea modesta

While in the Launceston area over the weekend I saw several species that I don't get to see around home. These include:

Black-fronted Dotterel (Elseyornis melanops) at Tamar Island Wetlands on the 26 April. Dusky Moorhen (Gallinula tenebrosa) at the Pitcher Parade Reserve on the 26 April. Dusky Moorhens are uncommon in Tasmania. Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus) at Cataract Gorge on the 26 April. Cataract Gorge is one of the few places where these feral birds are considered tickable. Also Royal Spoonbill (Platalea regia) ay Queechy lake. Question: Why are these spoonbills building a nest in April? Is that normal? There are only a handful of Spoonbills in Tasmania so I'm not too familiar with them.

Royal Spoonbills - Platalea regia at Queechy Lake (Nest building in April? )

Royal Spoonbill - Platalea regia at Queechy Lake


 
Best of all were two Tawny Frogmouths (Podargus strigoides) at Cataract Gorge.  This is not a great photo as, for one thing, you can't see their faces. On the other hand, it's the only shot I have of these birds as I hardly ever find them so I'm happy to have got it. .

Tawny Frogmouths  - Podargus strigoides at Cataract Gorge


On 25th April I had Common Bronzewing (Phaps chalcoptera) and Noisy Miner  (Manorina melanocephala) west of Launceston. (I'm not complaining that I don't get Noisy Miners at home)

Common Bronzewing - Phaps chalcoptera


On 23rd April I was surprised to see a Pink Robin (Petroica rodinogaster)  in the backyard. This is a new bird for the "Backyard List". I usually see Pink Robins in the wet forests along the creeks and rivers. My backyard merges into dry forest on a rocky north facing slope. After reading up on the subject I found that Pink Robins disperse into dry forest and coastal scrub at this time of year. That explains why I haven't been able to find them down at the Emu River. It doesn't explain why they haven't been seen here in previous years. I didn't get a photo of the Pink Robin so I have included a couple from a previous encounters.

Pink Robin - Petroica rodinogaster


Adult Male Pink Robin -  Petroica rodinogaster

The Spotted Pardalotes (Pardalotus punctatus) have been quite vocal just about everywhere I go lately. This one was in the backyard on 19th April.
Spotted Pardalote - Pardalotus punctatus - in the Backyard

Also on the 19th I had a Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus)  fly over the backyard but it came and went before I could get the camera into position. 

On April 15th I saw my first Cattle Egrets (Bubulcus ibis) for the year in a paddock between Wynyard and Table Cape. At Rocky Cape, on the same day there was a Black Currawong (Strepera fuliginosa) just above the high tide mark. This is a bird I usually see up in the hills. The best bird on that day was the Striated Fieldwren (Calamanthus fuliginosus)  that featured in a post a couple of weeks ago. ( Click here )

On 13th April I came across two Fan-tailed Cuckoos (Cacomantis flabelliformis) at Fern Glade. Most of it's associates would have already left for the mainland at this time of year. I've seen them as late as May 28th and as early as August 16th so it's always hard to say whether they are early, late. or one of the few that overwinter.

On 1st April I was able to photograph a Bassian Thrush at Fern Glade. That photo was included in an earlier post. ( Click Here)


Also on the 1st I had a Tasmanian Scrubwren (Sericornis humilis) in the backyard. This is a bird I hear regularly but it seldom reveals itself from among thick undergrowth.

Well this is a just a few of the 87 species I've seen during April. I hope you enjoy seeing some of them.


19 comments:

  1. That is a very impressive bird list for April. The waterbirds and Frogmouths I know but the others only from pictures. I just wish some of those were more accessible from up here. I especially like the Pardalote.

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    1. Thanks Mick - I wish the waders were more accessible here.

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  2. These are stunning photos of an amazing set of birds. I would love to see a Pink Robin or Spotted Pardolote, but I don't think that will happen here in the southern U.S.

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    1. Grass is always greener on the other side. Would love to see the Red-Headed Woodpecker..

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  3. These images are fabulous.and I would love to see the Pink Robin.

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    1. Thanks Margaret - The British birds on your blog bring back some good memories.

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  4. The inflight shot of the Egret is amazing. Great shot.

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    1. Thanks Adam - I have a half dozen really bad shots to go with it :-)

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  5. Thanks for sharing a fabulous selection of species from your part of the globe.

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    1. Thanks for commenting Frank

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  6. Gorgeous birds. Love that first shot.

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    1. Thanks Pat - That seems to be the popular choice.

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  7. Awesome series of gorgeous birds.

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    1. Thanks for commenting Eileen

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  8. I never saw a pink Robin, i realy amazed !
    Wonderful pictures !
    Greetings from Germany, i come visiting from " Saturday´s Critters

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  9. Hello, Just stopping back to say thank you for linking up and sharing your post. The Royal Spoonbill is awesome! Have a happy weekend!

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  10. What a beautiful variety. Love the darling little pink robins! :)

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  11. Great shots of all the birds. Love the flight shots.

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  12. The egret in flight is a stunning pic. Those pink robins are very cute!
    ~

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