Friday, 22 January 2010

Gunns Plains Cave

..... Limestone Cave

I haven't posted much of late. That's partly due to being busy and partly due to having broken my SLR camera. It seems the repair bill may be $300 or more so I taking my time deciding whether to repair or upgrade. In any case it meant that on a recent visit to Gunns Plains Cave I had to make do with a small compact camera. The images are not great but they at least give an idea of some of the magnificent formations within the cave. Some better quality shots can be seen in an older post here.

The public access to the cave takes you a little short of 300 metres in and to a depth of around 55 metres. Speleogists have mapped the cave to at least another 1 km.

In no particular order, here are the cave photos:


(Click on photos to enlarge)
#1


#2


#3


#4 - Helectite


#5


#6


#7 - This shawl formation is reputed to be the largest in Australia


#8


#9


#10 - This stalactite looks like a giant uvula


#11 - The wedding cake. The dark areas are caused by bushfire smoke (possibly centuries ago) entering the cave.

#1 2 - The creek that flows through the cave.
Home to the Giant Tasmanian Crayfish which grows up to a metre in length.






8 comments:

  1. Hi Alan, what a stunning cave! Your little point and shoot camera did pretty good I think! That shawl formation is a bit special! Hope your DSLR woes are shortly over!

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  2. Amazing formations in the caves. Good work with the little camera. I'll be interested to hear what you do about replacing the SLR.

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  3. What a terrific place. Those pics are great for a point and shoot. And we do have the earlier ones to fill in the blanks.

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  4. Hi Alan,
    I am impressed with your report of the Giant Tasmanian Crayfish (presumably some kind of "Super Yabby").
    Re the smoke marks, in the early days (pre electricity), visitors would light fires inside Limestone Caves to see the formations.
    It certainly happened in NSW - Jenolan Caves, etc.
    Nice photos.
    Old Ones are quite different, but I like the new ones just as much - you see things in different ways.
    Cheers
    Denis

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  5. Thanks Jenny, Mick, Snail, & Denis - Still haven't made the camera decision.

    That cave is well worth a visit. That was my second time through and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

    The cave were discovered in 1906 so no doubt people used fire and oil lamps etc but according to the guide the smoke damage is older. I assume they base that on how deeply the fresh limestone has since covered it. Having said that, I remember at Jenolan 30 years ago, the guide was telling us how many thousands of years it takes for a stalactite to form. Then off the record he pointed out several 40 cm stalactites on some of the hand railings from around the turn of the last century.

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  6. Absolutely lovely Denis. Remember, better average shots than no shots at all!!

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  7. How exciting it must be to live in Tasmania!
    For someone who was shooting pics on the fly w/a camera you were unfamiliar with...WOW. This is National Geographic quality here.
    Good job!

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  8. How exciting it must be to live in Tasmania!
    For someone who was shooting pics on the fly w/a camera you were unfamiliar with...WOW. This is National Geographic quality here.
    Good job!

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