Wednesday, 19 November 2008

Wildflowers

I took a wee walk up the back hill today to photograph some of the plants which are currently flowering as well as some that are already setting seed. Here's what I found:


(Click on Photos to Enlarge)

#1 - Pale Flaxlily - Dianella longifolia


#2 - Heartleaf Bushpea - Pultenaea daphnoides


#3 - Heartleaf Bushpea - Pultenaea daphnoides


#4 - Forest Daisybush - Olearia lirata


#5 - Sag- Lomandra longifolia


#6 - Native Pigface - Carpobrotus rossii


#7 - Manuka - Leptospermum scoparium


#8 - Hop Native-primrose - Goodenia ovata



#9 - Large Kangaroo Apple - Solanum laciniatum


#10 - Sunshine Wattle - Acacia terminalis



5 comments:

  1. Love those natives Mosura, all familiar to me, a delight to the eye.

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  2. Didn't know you had Manuka down there. Gets a Kiwi all nostalgic.

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  3. Hi Mosura
    Lovely shots. Surprised to see the Sunshine Wattle there. Up here it is a "Sydney Sandstone" specialist plant. Common on the sandstone, but not found around Goulburn or Canberra, so I assumed it was a restricted distribution. Apparently not.
    Great Dianella shot.
    Cheers
    Denis

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  4. Hi Alan, some great flowers and photos, I love the first one the Pale Flax Lily, so delicate and beautifully framed. You also seem to have some pretty ugly names for some stunning flowers....SAG?, PIGFACE? (-: I've just finished a jar of Manuka Honey and it was delishous! The price has rocketed now though due to the Honey Bee problems across the world! I hope that can be sorted out PDQ!

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  5. I thought I had replied to these comments but apparently I didn't. Sorry about that.

    Thanks Duncan - and it's great having them almost at my back door.


    Thanks Tony - Plenty of Manuka here. I'll have to get myself a bee hive.


    Thanks Denis - Sunshine wattle is the most abundant Acacia on my block. The soil here is of a fine snadstone.

    Thanks Jenny - Not the most romantic of names ate they. That Manuka Honey is great for healing infected wounds.

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