Saturday, 10 December 2016

Koalas, Tasmanian Devils, and a Butterfly

I've posted three videos below showing a Koala, Tasmanian devils fighting and feeding , and a Pea-blue butterfly.

1. There are no wild Koalas in Tasmania. This one was filmed at the Wings Wildlife Park, Gunns Plains, Tasmania. As they sleep for up to 22 hours a day, it's always good when you can get a fews shots of them eating. It is sometimes erroneously referred to as a Koala 'bear'. However, the Koala is actually a tree dwelling marsupial. It has a pouch just like kangaroos and other marsupials. Just to confuse us though, the scientific name, Phascolarctos, comes from the ancient Greek phaskolos, referring to a pouch or bag, and arktos, meaning "bear" - A bear with a pouch :-)

 Koala feeding - Click the play button

2. Next up is the Tasmanian devil. We have occasionally heard and seen Tasmanian devils in the backyard but as they are mostly active at night I have no photos or video. The closest encounter was just a few feet away with a devil chasing our ducks around in circles. These ones in the video were at one of the  wildlife parks mentioned above.

The latin name, Sarcophilus harrisii, is interesting. Sarcophilus literally means 'meat lover'. I'm sure you will understand why after watching the video. It's also worth mentioning that the Tasmanian Devil has the strongest bite, relative to its size, of any animal.

Tasmanian Devils feeding and fighting   - Click the play button


3. Next we have a Long-tailed Pea-blue on the annual Lupins in my backyard. These are one of the many small Lycaenid butterflies known as 'Blues'.

The Long-tailed Pea-blue  has a wide distribution. According to the encyclopedia of Life, it  ranges from Africa to southern Europe, across southern Asia to Japan, India, Ceylon, the Philippines, and Australia and Samoa. It is a resident in the main islands of Hawaii, but is not found elsewhere in North America

Long-tailed Pea-blue Butterfly  - Click the play button

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Saturday, 3 December 2016

Lowland Copperhead Snake and a Waterfall

I came across this Lowland Copperhead snake (Austrelaps superbus) the other day at the Tamar Wetlands in Tasmania.  This is not related to the American snake of similar name. It is a  venomous snake of the Elapidae family that could (and have) kill an adult human. However, they will generally remain non aggressive as long as you don't interfere with them.    They can grow up to 4 1/2 feet. This one was at least 3 1/2 feet (maybe a little longer).  They are generally found in wet areas, creeks, swamps etc,  and feed on frogs, mice, larger insects, lizards etc.  It will even cannibalise smaller copperheads. Aside from Tasmania, they can also be found in other parts of south-eastern Australia.


 ( Copperhead Snake - Click the play button)

We also visited a waterfall recently. Delaney Falls, also known as Preston falls,  are located about 25km's south of Ulverstone in Tasmania. The wide angle lens was back at the car and the GoPro battery was dead so unfortunately I did not get a shot with the entire falls top to bottom. There is always a next time  :-)

  (Preston Falls - Click the play button)

Thank You!
Since September I've gone from about 12 subscribers on my YouTube channel to 123. Thank you all very much for your support and encouragement. If you have not yet subscribed please consider doing so, as not all of my videos appear on this blog. If you are logged in with your google account you simply need to use the Youtube/Subscribe button below.

I hope you enjoy the video.


 Click the button below to subscribe to my YouTube Channel